About Concrete Shamanism

Shamanism is the world’s most ancient spiritual practice and anthropologists have estimated that it began around 50,000 years ago. Shamans were the first people’s to see the light of God and then tell others. Medicine, science, music, art, fashion and agriculture were all gifts to humanity by the shamans. As vessels for spirit, they are mouthpieces for the divine.

In cultures all around the world shamans exist to serve their tribe and in order for a culture to thrive, they rely on the spirits to keep making shamans. A tribe without a shaman would often struggle to grow food, hunt game or effectively deal with hardships such as drought, famine and disease.

America has no native form of shamanism which previously made it difficult for shamanic practitioners to use rituals and ceremonies without cultural appropriation. Concrete Shamanism is a product of modern culture while marking a return to core shamanic concepts. Ever since Michael Harner introduced Westerners to Shamanism via his book The Way Of The Shaman, arbitrary rules have been established as to how shamans should behave, how they should practice and even if they should tell others what they are.

Overly romanticizing indigenous peoples while ignoring the shamans in our own backyard has led to a spiritual disconnection in our culture. People have become obsessed over their own unhappiness. They stay in situations and relationships that don’t serve them. They work jobs they hate and live in houses they cannot afford. There are race wars. Wars on men. Hatred and intolerance. And no one wins.